Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel


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It won the John Esten Cooke award for Ficiton , just to name one. Beware this is the same novel as Nobel Cause. It is the same book as Shades of Gray with a new ending. Hmm is this just another way to make money? Well I want to say that I loved this book!!

It kept my interest all the way through. It is action packed and full of events. The main character Andrea is a very strong woman.

You probably know by now that I like books with strong female characters. She is a spy for the union army, but was born and bred in Virginia. She is strong in her anti-slavery beliefs and loyal to the union. She falls in love with Colonel Hunter who is a legendary leader of the southern army. This is no doubt going to cause some problems.

There is also Victoria who is the southern belle in love with Colonel Hunter. This book is beautifully written and just sails along. It is a real page turner. I enjoyed it immensely.

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Scarecrow in Gray by Barry D. Yelton

The epilogue is a little long. If you like happy endings chose the Nobel Cause version. I will seriously considering picking up her new book Above and Beyond, which is a Christian Historical Romance. I give this book a strong 5 out of 5 stars. War is said to be Hell and certainly none can compare to the brutal American Civil War; brothers fighting brothers.

The Confederates in Virginia fiercely fought to protect their soil, their homes, their lives. Captain Alexander Hunter was crafted somewhat by a real life hero; his band of warriors keenly attuned to their calvary officer and his cunning leadership. Stealthily hitting the federal forces when and where they could, fighting a terrorist war of their own, demoralizing the federals wher War is said to be Hell and certainly none can compare to the brutal American Civil War; brothers fighting brothers.

Stealthily hitting the federal forces when and where they could, fighting a terrorist war of their own, demoralizing the federals where they could, capturing supplies and materiel as well as prisoners. The Union forces relentlessly continued their advance aided in part by a shadowy character of a very young agile rider on a large black horse quickly making a legend of his own. Was Sinclair a "he", or Andrea Evans, strong, independent, and fearless scout borne of harsh childhood experience.

As occurs so often, the lives of these two continue to intertwine; always finding themselves at odds until circumstances begin to force grudging respect. Andrea pushes the threshold of her spying activity until she is captured and presented to Captain Hunter wherein her fate rests. Spared a firing squad, but forever altering life thereafter her captive status eventually begins a torturous change in her philosophy of loyalty and honor. Fiercely competitive, intellectual equals, Captain Hunter and Andrea present a formidable force in both love and war. Not one to read romance novels, I downloaded this free offering from an interest in historical fiction, and was rewarded with a three-hanky novel powerful from beginning to end.

Recommended for Civil War buffs and anyone else interested in a hard-to-put-down yarn that leaves you emotionally drained and breathless. Dec 20, Scot rated it it was ok. This book description tricked me a bit—I was expecting historical fiction about the Civil War, and was even willing to accept a strong female lead capable of outriding, outfoxing, and outspying all the enemy combatants she encounters while disguised as an underage teen recruit boy soldier as we learned more about military strategies and maneuvers.

However, it turned into a major love story, evoking some of the more troubling mythical components of the GWTW fantasy, such as all slaves on plantati This book description tricked me a bit—I was expecting historical fiction about the Civil War, and was even willing to accept a strong female lead capable of outriding, outfoxing, and outspying all the enemy combatants she encounters while disguised as an underage teen recruit boy soldier as we learned more about military strategies and maneuvers.

However, it turned into a major love story, evoking some of the more troubling mythical components of the GWTW fantasy, such as all slaves on plantations of good masters served out of love and respect for the kindness and oversight of their benefactor, and would stay on in that system with that master, if only they could. Propagating that myth 75 years ago was problematic, continuing to do so in popular culture of just seems to me, in one word, wrong. However, for female readers who want a romance formula of the superwoman who can do everything falling for the platonic ideal of a southern gentlemen who is also the strongest, most talented guy around in every aspect possible, this is for you.

You should also believe a woman ought to give up her deepest political commitments and convictions and even switch sides in a war to be with the man of her dreams. Mar 29, Rachel rated it it was amazing Shelves: You won't be sorry. I won't say too much about the low ratings other than the fact that I disagree with two statements: The second statement is that it doesn't fit in the historical romance genre On to my review: I enjoyed the book immensely. I enjoy reading books set in this time period and especially if they involve romance, so I was thrilled to find it.

The book was well written. I believe that the author really did some research to make sure she made the story as believable as possible. The story was interesting and made me want to keep reading long after I should've retired for the night. Although I cried which is very unusual for me since I know it's fiction , I liked the ending.

Not all books have a HEA, although I understand there is a novel called Nobel Cause which is basically the same novel but with a HEA, I may have to get it and read it if only to see which ending I like better. Still, I must say that this book is going on my unforgettable shelf. Jun 25, Patricia rated it really liked it Shelves: She is proud, stubborn, feisty, and like many teenagers she burns with zeal.

When they meet they argue about everything until you're almost tempted to knock them upside the head with a 2 x 4! Interesting characters, beautiful descriptions of the Virginia countryside, and good word-pictures about the uglin Andrea Evans: Interesting characters, beautiful descriptions of the Virginia countryside, and good word-pictures about the ugliness of war. The book was also know as Noble Cause in other editions. No sex Violence-appropriate to a war If you like historical fiction, give this a shot. It's not horrible although it doesn't come close to Gone With the Wind, as some reviews have suggested , although it is somewhat formulaic.

The dialogue can be stilted and the storyline is implausible at times. It seems like a good second draft, but the book needs work by both the author and editor. I had higher hopes after seeing the ratings here. Apr 12, Rebecca rated it it was amazing. This book is the original version to Noble Cause by Jessica James. The endings are different and I urge you to read both of them and decide which version you like best. This book will take you back to the Civil War, make you feel like you are living in it, and make you nostalgic for that old world romance. Started out well, but then in the middle, there were too many petty arguments between Alex and Andrea, which became annoying, causing the war to be the background in the story, and not the main focus.

Agree with another reviewer, that the ending was disappointing, and veered off in a different direction from the rest of the book. Jul 10, Suzanne Petrella rated it it was ok. Too long The story was at its bare bones a good one. It was ridiculously repetitive and the characters were predictable. It would have been a good short story. But guess who couldn't put it down?

Jan 16, Joyce rated it liked it. It had interesting content but there was too much bantering between the two main characters. Feb 18, Alisa rated it did not like it Shelves: It's the rare novel that I can't finish. First, I can get interested in any topic. So if I just can't power through it, well, it must be awful. And Shades of Gray is awful in just about every way.

There's the trite storyline: Really, ladies, we deserve better. Then there's the It's the rare novel that I can't finish. Then there's the portrayal of the kindly Southern gentleman and his devoted slaves. Then there's the writing: Daniel drew her even closer, surprised and her softness and fragile vulnerability. The one positive thing I can say about Shades of Gray is that it made me realize I, too, could be a novelist.

If that kind of crap can get published and even have a trove of readers who enjoy it , there's hope for my writing career. Feb 17, Lisa rated it really liked it. I Cried My Eyes Out! Conditions for the South were bleak for the last two years of the war.

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They couldn't replace anything they used, had no food, boots, clothes, anything. I believe more died from sickness and starvation than from battle wounds by the end of it. Traveller captures the essence of Lee. He's considered to be a great human being. That's debated since he was a slave owner, though he fits the mold of a benevolent one.

He educated his slaves which was illegal , eventually freed them, helped fund the move to Liberia effort, and urged allowing slaves to serve in the Confederate army with manumission being a reward for doing so. Still, looking at him through 21st century eyes some will never see him as anything but evil because he once owned slaves. He was a complex man, but honor was a big part of him and his loyalties lay with his home state. He was also a really good general. He made a few boneheaded maneuvers such as Pickett's Charge, but a war that could've been over in six months to a year lasted instead for four years, and Lee's generalship is part of the reason for that due to a combination of skill, luck, and bad decisions from the Union generals he was facing.

He also had a way of instilling confidence and loyalty in his men that no one else could manage. No matter how bleak something might seem, he was able to make people feel better about it and get them to carry on. Traveller tells us all about it. And about how well he treated his horses even if he didn't have anything for them to eat sometimes.

He did the absolute best he could with what he had. This book won't appeal to a wide audience.

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In order to enjoy it you'll need an interest in the War Between the States and prior knowledge of it might be required for following it. An interest in battle specifics, strategy, and tactics wouldn't be amiss either. If you don't have those, reading this might be slow going for you. If you do have those, then this book is awesome. And I'm going to leave this here because I can: Now, I know some people consider it akin to sacrilege to prefer this cover over The Band 's original version, but I can't help it; this one just does it for me even if Joan's politics makes my skin crawl.

Like Linda Ronstadt, she has a wonderful voice though the personalities make me want to puke. Still, this song strikes a chord with me and she sings it beautifully. View all 6 comments. Aug 22, Tamora Pierce rated it it was amazing Shelves: I love this book. It is absolutely brilliant: Lee's favorite horse, Traveller. The book begins with Traveller in a barn, the old campaigner telling stories to a rapt pair of cats. He explains how he started out, under another name and other ownership, a young horse with a good reputation.

It is this which brought him to the attention of the Confederate command, and then to the man he would call "Marse Robert. It's also a great way to see the legends of the army: Stuart is "Jine the Cavalry" for his habit of always saying "join the cavalry!

For those who might be confused about the timeline, there are paragraphs between the tales, explaining what is taking place between the armies.

And through it all is an extraordinary love between horse and man. Jun 15, Jake rated it really liked it Shelves: Ever wondered how Mr. Ed would have held up as a Civil War steed? But Richard Adams had such musings it seems, and they resulted in this novel novel. Sorry, had to go for the trite word play. Lee, legendary Confederate General, had a horse named Traveller. This is historical fact. Locked into that premise, the novel is a bit Ever wondered how Mr.

Locked into that premise, the novel is a bit less satisfying than say, The Killer Angels. Still, the narrative is enjoyable and often intense, including a graphic depiction of the fate many horses faced. Just remember the horses often had it better than the foot soldier, if only because they were attached to well-fed officers.


  • Scarecrow in Gray.
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Lastly, I will say this is a book I found without the aid of a catalog or search engine. View all 5 comments. Apr 11, Annie rated it it was amazing. Another all time favorite I really love Richard Adams. This one tells the story of the civil war, from the point of view of Robert E.

Again, could be read as a children's book, but it's really not and is as good a book on the civil war as any other I've read. Jul 08, M. Anderson rated it it was amazing. A history lesson from the point of view of the horses that served in the Civil War. Jun 21, Geoff Sebesta rated it really liked it Shelves: In my life I have read many books, and this is one of the weirdest. There's great difficulty to knowing where this book was coming from, and close to the end I figured out why; because it is coming from three places at once. It is an experiment by a great writer.

It is a indulgent exercise by a doddering old Englishman. And it is possibly the greatest book ever written from the point of view of a horse It isn't precisely a good book, and it definitely might be a bad boo In my life I have read many books, and this is one of the weirdest. It isn't precisely a good book, and it definitely might be a bad book but not bad in a bad way. Normally when I read a book on the American Civil War my first question is, what about slavery?

What's this book's opinion on slaves?

Shades of Gray: A Novel of the Civil War in Virginia

Traveller has no opinion on slavery. As far as he's concerned the Civil War had no effect whatsoever on the sort of slavery that he's born into. So is this a coded plea for animal rights? Considering the author, I had my suspicions. And then something truly baffling happened. I very rarely give spoiler warnings, but if you have any serious intention of reading this book, you might want to skip this part or you will not be able to read the book in the way the author intended.

Simply giving you this information will influence your feelings about the book the entire time and the giant synaptic "jump" at the end of the book, where Adams attempts to actually put you in the head of a horse, will not play quite out the same. I'm not saying it won't be a good book, but it won't be the same. Okay, the horse thinks that the South won the Civil War. Which is so insane that it must be true.

But this is deeply undone by the long and winding middle of the book. Adams is obviously one of those weird British aficionados of the American Civil War, might even be one of those guys who goes out to a field near Colchester or something to re-enact Antietam. It's a real thing, look it up, they really do American Civil War re-enactments in England. Either way, Adams's middle-aged delight in knowing all the battles of the Civil War possesses him at some point, and he can't resist introducing you to all the officers of Lee's high command and their horses and taking you step-by-step through four years of war, every battle, every skirmish.

I bet it's all historically accurate, too. When it's so dense and complex that it's obvious that not even a talking horse could understand it, then Adams actually squishes in news dispatches written in a sort of newspaper jargon, conveniently translating what just happened from "horse" to "history.

Basically the middle part is much, much too long to maintain the illusion that it's anything other than a magical talking horse. The real horse-y parts, at the beginning and end, are undermined by Mr. Ed Goes To War in the middle. The ending, in which Traveller doesn't exactly understand that General Lee has passed away, doesn't really work in the same book as Traveller the Civil War Correspondent who tells us Stonewall Jackson was shot by one of his own sentries at the Battle of Chancellorville.

Either a horse knows the news or he don't, but you can't change your mind mid-novel. This book is marbled through and through with deep streaks of illogic and unseemliness. I was curious how the horse would deal with the starving soldiers eating horses, but that never comes up at all. He knows enough English to make fun of a German guy's accent but not enough to know what the word "war" means.

Perhaps worst of all, Traveller's opinion of slavery is sufficient for a horse, but not sufficient for Mr. There are a lot of problems like that. But, like I said, this book does a better job of getting inside a horse's head than any other book I've ever read At times it really works. The American Civil War must be one of the greatest slaughters of horses in human history, and it's an important story that deserves to be told, and to be told from this particular and bizarre point of view.

I only wish Adams had worked on it, not as a professional producing a book for the public, but as a maniac who can't let something go for decades. This book needed another decade of editing and polishing and general re-jiggering. To ask other readers questions about Scarecrow in Gray , please sign up.

Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Oct 29, Paul rated it really liked it. Francis Yelton actual ancestor of the author is a reluctant participant in the last months of the Civil War. He would much rather stay on his North Carolina farm, but, he also does not want to be known as the 19th Century equivalent of a draft dodger. These are desperate times for the Southerners. The men are haggard, exhausted collections of skin and bones. Starvation is an everyday concern; when there Francis Yelton actual ancestor of the author is a reluctant participant in the last months of the Civil War.

Starvation is an everyday concern; when there is food, which is rare, it is usually moldy and inedible. More men are lost to disease and desertion than to northern artillery. Deserters are usually shot on sight. Alongside small pockets of humanity, Whit and Francis see the horror of war, up close and personal. The first Union soldier that Francis kills in hand-to-hand combat is only a teenager, who forgives Francis as he dies.

Both Francis and Whit are injured, so they experience a field hospital. Whit loses one of his eyes, and the eye socket has to be cleaned out, to prevent the onset of gangrene.


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  8. Both men are at Appomattox Court House to witness the official end of the war. On their way back home, both men are distressed to learn that the killing does not end just because the war is over. As much as possible, this is a historically accurate novel, and it shows. It was written by someone who really knows his way around the finer points of the War Between The States. By all means, read the official histories of the Civil War.

    Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel
    Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel
    Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel
    Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel
    Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel
    Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel
    Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel
    Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel Scarecrow in Gray: A Civil War Novel

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